Veteran’s Aid and Attendance Pension Income Levels – 2019

Pension and Survivors Pension will pay the difference between the claimant’s gross household income – adjusted for out-of-pocket medical costs – and the applicable Maximum Annual Pension Rate.

There are 9 pension incomes commonly paid from the tables listed below depending on whether it is a veteran – married or single, a surviving spouse and whether there is a rating. An additional number of less common pension incomes are also available from the tables.

Here are the pension and survivor rate tables for 2019 and effective until December 1, 2019.

Pension — Maximum Annual Pension Rates (MAPR) 2018-19

These amounts increased by 2.8% on 12 / 01 / 2018

For a Living Veteran

Yearly

Monthly

Without Spouse or Child

$13,535

$1,127

Medical Deduction

$676

$56

With One Dependent

$17,724

$1,477

Medical Deduction

$886

$74

Housebound Without Dependents

$16,540

$1,378

Housebound With One Dependent

$20,731

$1,727

Aid and Attendance Without Dependents

$22,577

$1,881

Aid and Attendance With One Dependent

$26,766

$2,230

Add for Each Additional Child

 

$2,313

$192

Death Pension — Maximum Annual Pension Rates (MAPR) 2018-19

For a Surviving Spouse

Yearly

Monthly

Without Dependent Child

$9,078

$756

Medical Deduction

$453

$38

With One Dependent Child

$11,881

$990

Medical Deduction

$594

$50

Housebound Without Dependents

$11,095

$924

Housebound With One Dependent

$13,893

$1,157

Aid and Attendance Without Dependents

$14,509

$1,209

Aid and Attendance With One Dependent

$17,833

$1,486

Add for Each Additional Child

$2,313

MAPR FOR CHILD ALONE

$2,313

How is Pension Income with Aid and Attendance Calculated?

Veterans Pension income is based on subtracting the claimant’s adjusted household income from a maximum yearly benefit amount called the “Maximum Annual Pension Rate” (MAPR). The difference is paid to the claimant as income.

A claimant’s annual household income – the combined income of husband, wife and dependent residents where applicable – must be less than the applicable MAPR for that particular type of claim in order to generate a benefit. The actual benefit paid to the claimant is the difference between the applicable MAPR and the combined annual gross household income reduced for medical costs and adjusted by a 5% deductible. This calculated annual pension income is then divided by 12 and rounded down and paid as a monthly benefit.

Max Possible Benefit – ((Gross Income – Deductible Medical Expenses) + 5% deductible) = Actual Benefit